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Mandolin Quality

Preferably a mandolin sound play easily and securely, giving a complex, available, and response that is immediate. These qualities originate from design, construction quality, and materials. In training, materials may differ greatly in acoustic quality without correlation to appearance.

Afficionados tend to grade quality on lumber selection, adherence to designs that are traditional materials, and execution. Many point to hard carving to support the in-patient pieces of lumber, lightweight for easy resonance, and old-fashioned construction. Conventional construction includes a throat fitted by having a joint that is dovetail a single action bent truss rod (strengthening and permitting adjustment regarding the neck), and hand applied varnish, instead of sprayed on urethane.

Another point may be the glue utilized. Numerous adhesives behave as a barrier to vibration, forming a somewhat dense "gasket" between the pieces and sometimes permitting creep as time passes. In comparison, old-fashioned hide glue is difficult and vanishingly thin in properly fitted joints, creating an acoustically transparent joint. Our Eastman mandolins use hide glue.

Finishes are specifically essential. Many low end mandolins have actually sprayed on finishes with exorbitant stiffness and depth. Any finish will tend to remove a number of the richness of the bass and thin out the treble range. On the other hand, raw timber accumulates dirt and oils from playing, becoming soggy sounding. The very best finishes are thin, relatively soft, and extremely flexible. These finishes don’t emerge from a spray can. All Eastman mandolins have slim, hand brushed varnish. Some are topped with nitrocellulose lacquer for the more durable area layer.
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Mandolin Quality

Ideally a mandolin sound play easily and securely, offering a complex, open, and response that is immediate. These qualities come from design, construction quality, and materials. In practice, materials can vary significantly in acoustic quality without correlation to appearance.

Afficionados tend to grade quality on lumber selection, adherence to designs that are traditional materials, and execution. Many point to hard carving to allow for the individual bits of wood, lightweight for easy resonance, and construction that is traditional. Traditional construction features a neck fitted with a dovetail joint, a single action bent truss rod (strengthening and allowing modification for the neck), and hand applied varnish, as opposed to sprayed on urethane.

Another point could be the glue used. Numerous adhesives become a barrier to vibration, developing a relatively thick "gasket" between the pieces and sometimes permitting creep over time. In contrast, old-fashioned hide glue is hard and vanishingly thin in properly fitted joints, creating an acoustically clear joint. Our Eastman mandolins use hide glue.

Finishes are specially important. Many end that is low have sprayed on finishes with extortionate stiffness and thickness. Any finish will have a tendency to take out a number of the richness associated with bass and thin out the range that is treble. Having said that, raw wood picks up dirt and natural oils from playing, becoming soggy sounding. The greatest finishes are thin, reasonably soft, and highly versatile. These finishes don’t come out of a spray can. All Eastman mandolins have actually slim, hand brushed varnish. Some are topped with nitrocellulose lacquer for the more surface layer that is durable.